software recruitment consultants

Questions to ask at the end of your Interview

Asking questions at the end of the interview when invited can show your enthusiasm and preparedness. They can also help to end the interview on a high note, so think carefully about what you want to ask.

We suggest preparing at least 4 or 5 interview questions in advance with the understanding that some will be covered by the time it is your chance to ask them.

Here are some potential interview questions to consider:

Who would I be reporting to? Are those three people on the same team or on different teams? Helps to understand the pecking order especially if the role has several bosses or dotted line responsibilities.

Will I have an opportunity to meet those who would be part of my staff/my manager during the interview process?  Getting the chance to meet with potential team members or managers is always useful during the interview process.

Can you tell me what steps need to be completed before your company can generate an offer?  Understanding the timeline involved and what the organisation needs to get to the offer stage is useful.

Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?  Can be awkward highlighting weaknesses but it shows confidence and gives you the opportunity to address any concerns they may have.

What do you like most about working for this company?  A good bonding question as it gives your interviewer a chance to share their perspective. Plus, it gives you some insight into what is good about working for the company.

How would you describe the company’s culture?  This question gives you a broad view on the corporate philosophy of a company and hopefully an indication of its take on employee wellbeing.

What are the challenges of this position?  A smart question to give you a broader outlook on the role.

If you were to hire me, what might I expect in a typical day?  Shows your eagerness about the detail of the position, also gives you a better idea about what the job will be like which is helpful in deciding if you want to pursue it.

Where do you see the company in three years?  Shows the interviewer that you are aware of the bigger picture / strategic view.

What are some of the problems your company faces right now? And what is your department doing to solve them?  This is good for getting your interviewer can share their opinion. Also, their answers may give you insights into their thinking / ambitions / personality.

What’s your timeline for making a decision, and when can I expect to hear back from you?  This one tells them you’re interested in the role and eager to hear their decision.

I read XX about your organisation. Can you tell me more about this?  This type of interview question simply show you’ve done your homework and are genuinely interested in the business.

Do you need me to elaborate on anything I said or clarify anything in my CV?  Offer to go into greater detail on any answers you may have given, or any jobs or accomplishments listed on your CV.

Is there anything we haven’t covered that you think is important to know about working here?  We like this as a good closing question that putting the ball in the interviewer’s court. Plus, you may get important info you didn’t know / think to ask about.

Sales professionals may consider interview questions that are particularly relevant to sales roles. For example, asking what their top sales performer currently generates in revenue, or even questions that can help demonstrate your ability to overcome objections. For example:

  • What reasons are there that you feel might prevent you from hiring me?
  • How does my background and performance compare to your existing sales team?

In conclusion…

Ask 2 – 3 smart, thoughtful interview questions that will not only demonstrate that you are keen but also give a better sense of the role and the company.